WSNC Local Programming

Bookmarked With Sarah McCoy Welcomes Lisa See

Mar 19, 2019
Lisa See

Bookmarked with Sarah McCoy airs the last Thursday of the month at 4:30 p.m. on 90.5 FM WSNC, or as opportunities for good conversation with authors arise. Sarah McCoy is the New York Times, USA Today, and international bestselling author of Marilla of Green Gables (William Morrow/Harper Collins); The Mapmaker’s Children; The Baker’s Daughter, a 2012 Goodreads Choice Award Best Historical Fiction nominee; The Time It Snowed in Puerto Rico; the novella “The Branch of Hazel” in Grand Central; and Le souffle des feuilles et des promesses, a French exclusive title.

Forsyth Free Tax

WSNC 90.5 F.M. is sponsored in part by Experiment In Self-Reliance and Forsyth Free Tax, offering free tax preparation assistance and filing for qualified households at eight locations.

Piedmont Opera

Music is made possible by WSNC donors and Piedmont Opera, presenting "Elixir of Love," where romance conjured by a magic potion is no match for the real thing in Donizetti's comic romp. March 15th, 17th and 19th, at the Stevens Center.

Integrated Marketing

WSNC 90.5 FM broadcasts the weekly program "WSSU Futre Focus," hosted by Winston-Salem State University Chancellor Elwood Robinson, Thursdays at 1 p.m. LISTEN @ www.wsncradio.org!

This week, Chancellor Robinson leads a discussion about what to expect at the 2019 CIAA Tournament.

Also, don't forget to cast your vote to help Miss Winston-Salem State University Christina Harris in her quest to become the next Miss CIAA.

Piedmont Opera Presents, "The Elixir of Love"

Feb 18, 2019
Piedmont Opera

Music is made possible by WSNC donors and Piedmont Opera, presenting The Elixir of Love, where romance conjured by a magic potion is no match for the real thing in Donizetti's comic romp. March 15th, 17th and 19th, at the Stevens Center.

More News

Today's Schedule

It was a frigid 15 degrees on the picket line along the railroad tracks in Wilmerding, Pa. More than 100 union members and activists chanted slogans of solidarity and in favor of a fair contract with Wabtec Corporation — a company that builds freight train locomotives. It turned out to be the final hours of a nine-day walkout by 1,700 workers.

Days after three separate suicides in Parkland, Fla., and Newtown, Conn. left those communities reeling, the Senate is doing something rare for a GOP-led chamber: holding a hearing on gun control.

Updated at 10:45 a.m. ET

The Department of Defense is shifting $1 billion from a military personnel account to build a 57-mile fence at the southern U.S. border, saying the funds were freed up after some service branches fell short of their recruiting goals.

The Pentagon won't allow its plan to interfere with military readiness, Acting Defense Secretary Patrick M. Shanahan told members of Congress Tuesday, seeking to ease concerns about the controversial shift of appropriated funding made possible by President Trump's declaration of a national emergency.

That is not one small step for women.

History was supposed to be made Friday when, for the first time, two female astronauts were scheduled to do a spacewalk together outside the International Space Station. However, one of the astronauts was switched out this week because of a lack of "spacesuit availability."

Army Gen. Paul Nakasone, who heads both the National Security Agency and the U.S. Cyber Command, usually doesn't say much in public. But recently, he's been on what amounts to a public relations blitz. The message he's pushing is that the U.S. will be more aggressive in confronting and combating rivals in cyberspace.

As thousands of migrant parents and children continue to stream across the U.S.-Mexico border every day, the Border Patrol is bringing in more agents and asking the Pentagon for additional help.

The Border Patrol says it needs more manpower to care for the migrants — more of whom are coming with infectious illnesses. Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen says agents are on track to stop nearly 100,000 people crossing illegally this month — far exceeding last month's total.

Senate Republicans will force a vote on the Green New Deal this week as part of an ongoing effort to turn the provocative climate change resolution into a wedge issue in the 2020 elections. Democrats say the GOP gambit carries its own political risk of mocking an issue that is a priority for a growing number of Americans.

Last October, Esteban Serrano wrenched his knee badly during his weekly soccer game with friends.

Serrano, a software engineer, grew up playing soccer in Quito, Ecuador, and he has kept up the sport since moving to the United States two decades ago.

He hobbled off the field and iced his knee. But the pain was so severe that he made an appointment with Rothman Orthopaedic Institute, a network of orthopedists practicing in Greater Philadelphia, New Jersey and New York.

If it's been a few years since you shopped for a light bulb you might find yourself confused. Those controversial curly-cue ones that were cutting edge not that long ago? Gone. (Or harder to find.) Thanks to a 2007 law signed by President George W. Bush, shelves these days are largely stocked with LED bulbs that look more like the traditional pear-shaped incandescent version, but use just one-fifth the energy.

With Rainbow Butterfly Unicorn Kitty on one side and bulbous-headed Fart Ninjas on the other, the gender divide was impossible to avoid at the North American International Toy Fair in New York City back in February.

The light-up Barbie mermaids vying for space with Gatling-style foam-dart blasters in Manhattan's Javits Center raised a question: Have toys really progressed since our grandparents' days? And how do the toys we play with shape the people we grow up to be?

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